Weekend Cocktail: Morgenthaler’s Chinese Five Spice Dark ‘N’ Stormy

One month ago, I posted about Lisa’s favorite cocktail—at least it was when I met her—the Dark ‘N’ Stormy. As mentioned before, home bartending has become my hobby ever since we built our own bar cart. As I’ve read more about the art of tending bar, I learned who some of the major players and innovators of the industry were and came across Jeffrey Morgenthaler’s book “The Bar Book” at our fair city‘s local library (I’m going to miss you Cambridge Main).

As one of very few books devoted entirely to bar techniques, with a handful of recipes that utilize them, it’s a great starter book for anyone with an interest in bartending. When I came across Jeff’s recipe for ginger beer and then later his Gosling’s Chinese Five Spice Rum, I knew I found a winning combo. But enough from me, I couldn’t possibly describe it better than he does below.

.I love it too Jeff! A satisfying highball it most certainly is!

Enjoy it Responsibly!

-Ryan

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DIY: Ginger Beer

With the first week of March complete, the doldrums of winter nearly over (fingers-crossed), and a historic Pi Day approaching at week’s end, it’s time for a project post! This time it’s about making our new favorite cocktail variation on a longtime favorite, the Morganthaler Dark ‘N’ Stormy, an ideal springtime libation with a spicy kick in the pants!

Recently Lisa and I sent out invitations for a party we decided to host in honor of this year’s once-in-a-lifetime Pi Day (3/14/15). While our party may not be the grandest celebration in our fair city, (see MIT’s admissions letters going out here), we will have fun! We’re asking our guests to bring sweet or savory pies (think apple, key lime, shepherd’s, even pizza) and I plan to make a batch of my new favorite variation of our favored drink for our guests.

What follows is my guide to making Morgenthaler’s ginger beer recipe with champagne yeast. Then in a few days, I’ll post his pain-free Chinese Five Spice Rum recipe, which frankly could not possibly be easier. This will be my fourth batch of the ginger beer and through my own experimentation I’ve found one hack that yields greater consistency when using yeast than Morgenthaler’s original recipe on his blog or in his book.

My contribution to his recipe is a volumetric measure of yeast. Morgenthaler’s suggestion of the “tip of a paring knife” or “roughly 25 granules of yeast” (who’s really going to count granules?) didn’t satisfy me, through trial and error I found the volume—one pinch (1/16 tsp.) that produced the best result for my tastes (see below).

Experiments!
Science!

In the following ratios you’ll need (per 16 oz. bottle):

  • 1 oz. fresh ginger juice
  • 2 oz. finely strained fresh lemon juice
  • 3 oz. simple syrup
  • 10 oz. water
  • 1/16 tsp. (one pinch) Red Star champagne yeast

Or (if using 12-oz. bottles) adjust to:

  • .75 oz. fresh ginger juice
  • 1.5 oz. finely strained lemon juice
  • 2.25 oz. simple syrup
  • 7.5 oz. water
  • 1/16 tsp. (one pinch) Red Star champagne yeast (yes, I realize this is the same as a 16 oz. bottle, but I until I find a means of measuring 1.75/32 tsp. it’ll do)

Making the ginger beer:

As Morgenthaler suggests, there is one piece of equipment you need if you plan to make ginger beer more than once, and that is a juice extractor (we use this breville juicer, better one’s exist, but it works sufficiently well). Alternatively, I’ve seen people use a blender/food processor in concert with an orange squeezer and cheesecloth. I find that even with the juice extractor the ginger pulp is still moist enough that I now use this second method to increase the yield. One last word, I peel the ginger root before juicing it, but I’ve seen others not peel—your choice (I imagine the skins would give a woodier taste).

IMG_0731
Notice how moist the pulp still appears.
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I recommend squeezing the pulp out with an orange press (make sure you wrap it first in cheesecloth).

Next, you’re going to need your freshly squeezed and filtered lemon juice. While one could certainly use the breville juicer for this step, lemons are so soft and easily juiced that it can more easily be done by hand. In this case, I used a citrus hand press, which can be found on amazon for less than $10 here, or comparably priced in any restaurant supply store—we bought ours at China Fair in Porter Square. Just pay attention to the ratios above.

Now for the simple syrup. You have options here, depending on how much you need, you could make it on a stovetop, or even in a microwave. Just remember that “simple” syrup is a 1:1 mixture of sugar and water. Again, pay attention to the ratios.

Finally, mix your ingredients together with water and fill your bottles using a funnel. For consistency, make sure to measure out either 12 ounces or 16 ounces, depending on the size of bottles you’re using, with a 2-cup glass measuring cup. Add your yeast, cap, and store under the kitchen sink for 48 hours.

Mix and pour into your bottles.
Mix and pour into your bottles.
IN 48 hours your delicious goodness will be ready!
In 48 hours your delicious goodness will be ready!

Enjoy!

-Ryan

DIY: Limoncello, Part 2: Bottling

IMG_0545

Limoncello is an italian lemon liqueur that is traditionally served after a meal in Italy, as a digestif (or digestivo, in Italian). The genesis of my interests in mixology along with Lisa’s recent borrowing of Eugenia Bone’s cookbook “The Kitchen Ecosystem” collided in late December when flipping through Bone’s book I discovered her limoncello recipe. As I was still in the Christmas giving mindset I thought what a wonderful gift idea! It’s a DIY gift, so the giftee will know it came from the heart, took both time and forethought, and it will last for months—so it’s a perfect gift! Only problem, it takes 2 months to make.

As promised in our original post, here’s the final product (the recipe, is here).

5. Filter the limoncello, first through cheesecloth, then through a coffee filter. Bottle it and store it in your freezer (it’s best served cold). It will keep forever.

Filter first through a cheesecloth.
Filter first through a cheesecloth.
Close up.
Close up.
IMG_0715
Then through a coffee filter.
Notice the color change.
Notice the color change.

Enjoy!

-Ryan

PS- In case you’re wondering, Lisa gave it her approval. I’ll second that! Not too sweet, not too strong. Perfect.

Remember that Limoncello, like gazpacho, is best served cold.
Remember that Limoncello, like gazpacho, is best served cold.

PPS- Team white and gold!

Weekend Cocktail: Dark ‘N’ Stormy

dark_n_stormy
Image credit: Eater NY (http://ny.eater.com/2014/10/24/7052949/the-dark-n-stormy#4327694)

The summer Lisa and I met, we were both interns at the University of Rochester Medical Center’s Strong Children’s Research Center program. Our romantic chemistry came to fruition one night at The Bug Jar—a well reviewed bar in Rochester, NY. That night was memorable for several reasons: aside from getting dumped by my former flame via an email, it was the first time Lisa, myself, and our peers went out for drinks and engaged in a friendly billiards competition. This might have been the first time Lisa saw my competitive side (As the youngest of three boys, I’ve grown to hate losing).

I remember during one intermission, Lisa ordered her favorite cocktail, the Dark ‘N’ Stormy. I’m not sure how a young man like myself could not fall for a smart, beautiful, Ivy-league grad, future doctor once she ordered that! I had never tasted a Dark ‘N’ Stormy before, but once she let me try her’s… well, the rest was history. Game over.

Ever since, this drink has had a special place in my heart because it reminds me of a moment when the thought first popped into my head that she might be the one for me.

Here’s the basic recipe:

  • Fill a collins glass with ice
  • Add 2 oz. Gosling’s Black Seal Rum (or try Jeffrey Morgenthaler’s spiced version)
  • Add 5 oz. ginger beer (Bundaberg’s or Barritt’s are the most traditional in style, or make it yourself!)

Happy Weekend!

-Ryan

DIY: Limoncello, Part 1

IMG_0545

Limoncello is an italian lemon liqueur that is traditionally served after a meal in Italy, as a digestif (or digestivo, in Italian). The genesis of my interests in mixology along with Lisa’s recent borrowing of Eugenia Bone’s cookbook “The Kitchen Ecosystem” collided in late December when flipping through Bone’s book I discovered her limoncello recipe. As I was still in the Christmas giving mindset I thought what a wonderful gift idea! It’s a DIY gift, so the giftee will know it came from the heart, took both time and forethought, and it will last for months—so it’s a perfect gift!

I decided to try it and see if it comes out any good! Here’s the recipe (I’ll add a Part 2, final product post in late February):

Makes 1.5 Pints of Limoncello (or roughly a full 750 mL bottle)

  • 4 lemons (thoroughly scrubbed)
  • 1 pint of vodka (preferably 100 proof, pictured is 80 proof Stoli)
  • 1 cup of water
  • 3/4 cup of sugar

The steps:

1. Remove the zest of your scrubbed lemons with a vegetable peeler, being careful to avoid the pith (per Bone’s recipe, you need about 1/3 cup)

IMG_0546 IMG_0547

2. Combine the lemon zest and vodka in a pint jar, or any large jar (preferably a Ball-type jar). Screw on the lid and give it a healthy vigorous shake. Set aside for 1 month. Shake periodically (I found this part a great stress reliever).

IMG_0548  IMG_0551_2

3. After a month, transfer the lemon vodka mixture to a quart jar (I started with a half-gallon Ball jar, so I skipped this part)

4.In a small sauce pan, heat the water and add the sugar. Once the sugar is completely dissolved remove it from the heat and let cool. Add the simple syrup to the lemon vodka mixture. Give the mixture a few good shakes and put the limoncello away for another month.

Almost there! Stay tuned for “DIY: Limoncello, Part 2: Bottling” to see the final product.

-Ryan